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Intelligent Sizing of Detention Basins Using a Dynamic Hydraulic Model

Stormwater detention basins are an important part of Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD). When designing such a structure it is critical to size the basin correctly, but the problem of determining the correct size for a detention basin is far from trivial. Fortunately, purpose-built hydraulic modelling computer programs can perform much of the computational ‘heavy lifting’ – allowing engineers to make a better estimate of required detention basin size. This paper investigates the use of one such hydraulic model (CivilStorm by Bentley) in the design of a detention basin (and associated appurtenances) in a hypothetical urban design scenario.

 

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Providing Supplementary Water for Bangalore, India: Towards Water Sensitive Urban Design

Situated on a ridge and at an elevation of 900 metres above sea level, Bangalore in South India has one of India’s most difficult challenges to meet its water requirements. 810 million litres of water per day is pumped in to the city daily for a population of about 6 million. Another 500 million litres per day will be pumped with a new scheme. There is however a limit to water availability at around 1500 million litres per day. A recent award of a tribunal set up to adjudicate the sharing of river waters between 4 states has capped the water availability to Bangalore city at a very low level. The city is therefore actively supporting alternate source of water including rooftop rainwater harvesting. With an annual average rainfall of around 970 mm, distributed over nearly 60 rainy days the endowment of rain is considerable. Over the cities geographical extant of 1250 square kilometres this translates to nearly 3000 million litres per day. Industries and parks adopt rainwater harvesting in a big way.

 

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Saving Water using Monitoring, Auditing and Modelling

Water supply resources in Australia are coming under growing pressure from an increasing demand, coupled with the likely effects of climate change resulting in more variable rainfall in catchment areas. To extend the available supply to meet our needs, the available supply must be used more carefully and wastage eliminated.
The Water Savings Section of the NSW Government Architects Office has conducted water audits of government, industrial and commercial buildings across NSW and Australia including part of Sydney Water’s Every Drop Counts business program.

 

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Sustainable Urban Water Management Champions: What Do We Know About Them?

This paper describes what is currently known about emergent leaders (‘champions’) who act as change agents to promote the philosophy of sustainable urban water management. First, I suggest that the current context of urban water management in Australia increases the need for, and value of, leadership, including emergent forms like championship. I then draw on the findings of an international literature review, to highlight the significant role that champions play in processes of change, like the transition from traditional to more sustainable forms of urban water management in Australia. Finally, I present a preliminary conceptual model of sustainable urban water management championship based on the findings of the literature review. This model is being used as a theoretical platform to conduct in-depth, context-sensitive research on these champions within Australian water agencies and to develop practical strategies to promote the emergence and effectiveness of these leaders.

 

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Sustainable Water Management: Achieving A Culture of Change

In the driest continent on earth, population growth, extended drought conditions and the potential impact of climate change has hammered home the need for an integrated approach to water management. Water authorities, councils, water industry organisations and developers face many challenges in delivering sustainable solutions to urban water management issues associated with stormwater management, water recycling and reuse. One of the most significant challenges is managing the cultural and organisational changes necessary to adopt new ways of thinking and to become leaders in implementing new approaches to sustainable urban water management. The 2005 inaugural winner of the Brian Robinson Fellowship Jacquie White developed the Principles To Practice project, designed to explore socio-organisational issues associated with implementing sustainable water management, and investigate factors that influence effective knowledge building and information sharing.

 

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WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN THE REMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER ARSENIC CONTAMINATION IN BANGLADESH
Severe arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh has disrupted the idea of using shallow tube-wells for safe drinking water throughout the country. Millions of tube-wells that had been sunk in various parts of the country are now dispensing arsenic contaminated drinking water. As a result, thousands of people are suffering from arsenic related diseases. The severity of arsenic contamination necessitates restricted use of groundwater and a move to alternative water sources such as ponds, lakes, canals, rivers and rain. Assured, affordable and sustainable safe water sources are vital for all communities to combat an arsenic disaster.

 

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Water as a Detonator of a Model of Communitarian Sustainable Development: The Case of Villa García Márquez at La Barca, Jalisco, Mexico
The present work describes in general way a model of sustainable development applied to small communities, from considering to the water as a development axis. This proposal would be located in the community of Villa Garcia Marquez, Municipality of La Barca, Jalisco Mexico, which comprises the river basin of the Lake of Chapala, which is the most important natural water reservoir of the country and it displays remarkable environmental problems and of over-exploitation at the present time. The community Villa de Garcia Marquez, have an important backwardness in its development mainly because of the lack of fresh water, deforestation, low farming productivity, low quality of urban services and urban image, high migration from men to the United States, that’s why women integrated the population mainly, lack of job opportunities and human development.

 

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Urban Water Systems: Drivers of Climate Change?

Urban water systems contribute to climate change both directly through the fugitive greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with water storage reservoirs and wastewater treatment processes, and indirectly through significant energy and materials consumption. This paper presents the findings of an investigation of the GHG emissions associated with operating a case study urban water system in Melbourne, Australia. It was revealed that the appliances associated with the residential end uses of water were responsible for significantly more GHG emissions than all upstream and downstream operations.

 

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Towards An Institutional Capacity Assessment Framework For Sustainable Urban Water Management

The need to change urban water management to become more sustainable is widely recognised. Recently there has been considerable financial investment in urban water reform; however these reforms have not been as successful as anticipated, most likely because there is a lack of critical analysis of existing capacity and/or capacity deficits. Understanding and assessing institutional capacity is crucial to addressing existing institutional impediments. Institutional capacity includes the human resources, intra-organisational, inter-organisational and/or external rules and incentives capacity spheres.

 

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The Socio-Technical Challenges of Safe Water Supply in Rural Bangladesh

In the arsenic- and salinity-affected areas of Bangladesh, rural people still struggle  to procure safe drinking water due to technological, institutional and policy barriers. This paper identifies and analyzes these barriers by using a policy orientation approach. Social and decision processes are mapped to demonstrate the historic and present-day trends and conditions for water supply. Options for different potable water technologies are assessed and alternative future development scenarios using models of different water supply programs are projected for the provision of safe water for the rural communities in Bangladesh.

 

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