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Ian White

This paper reports on a water sensitive urban design initiative by an owner builder at a private residence in Ipswich, Australia. The project applies custom, emergent and established technologies to the management of the owners’ lifestyle preferences and problematic site conditions. It is also an innovative project from the perspective of current governance conditions, making use of previously untried regulatory mechanisms. The project comprises two integrated components: rainwater harvesting and onsite waste treatment, potentially offsetting household reliance on the mains water supply by as much as 90% and offering further beneficial externalities. Rainwater is harvested from a 135m roof catchment through a conveyance system that includes leaf diverters and screens, though no first flush diverter, to a 15kL PE storage tank. A high performance pump feeds the rainwater successively through a filter and water meter to a Bianco Rainsaver which enables switching between the rainwater supply and mains water back-up. Water is supplied throughout the house via a PE-X water service to every outlet except the kitchen sink. The kitchen sink (plumbed separately) permanently draws from the mains water supply, a necessity with Ipswich City Council regulations. Flow restrictors and AAA (or higher) rated fixtures and fittings are used throughout the home and a 30-tube 315L Endless Solar hot water service is used. All waste water (black and grey water) is processed onsite in an OzziKleen RP10A advanced secondary treatment plant that features custom modifications for this project (due to site conditions, but not affecting system performance). Permission to install the OzziKleen RP10A system was obtained under s4 of the Queensland Plumbing and Wastewater Code 2006, with this project as a test case. The paper presents the author/owner’s experience researching, installing and using the various technological components. It addresses problems and resolution of relevant compliance and regulation issues, with conclusions drawn from these experiences. It concludes with plans to operate the site as a non-commercial community education project.

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Quality of Collected Rainwater from Sri Lanka

Rainwater harvesting has gained popularity in rural areas of Sri Lanka during the last few years. Number of water supply projects somewith foreign funding has included rainwater harvesting as a technical option in their planning. The technology ha been disseminated by Lanka Rain Water Harvesting Forum and has been successfully taken on by the government sector as well as the non-government sector throughout the country. The greater attraction of the rainwater harvesting system is the low cost, simple design and construction technology, independence ofcentral system, accessible and easily maintained at household.

 

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Syed Azizul Haq, PEng, Executive Engineer, Public Works Department (PWD).

Introduction: Dhaka is the capital city of Bangladesh started growing in the year as a watch post land to a mega city today fostering about 130 lac people. Every day people from all corners are rushing to Dhaka with hope of having opportunity of making fortune by any means. Of them some are temporarily habiting and the rests are remaining floating. The primary hope of coming Dhaka is to getting work or business for survival first. Ultimately the competent can make room for living in Dhaka.

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A Case Study In Water Sensitive Urban Design - I White

This paper reports on a water sensitive urban design initiative by an owner builder at a private residence in Ipswich, Australia. The project applies custom, emergent and established technologies to the management of the owners’ lifestyle preferences and problematic site conditions. It is also an innovative project from the perspective of current governance conditions, making use of previously untried regulatory mechanisms. The project comprises two integrated components: rainwater harvesting and onsite waste treatment, potentially offsetting household reliance on the mains water supply by as much as 90% and offering further beneficial externalities. Rainwater is harvested from a 135m roof catchment through a conveyance system that includes leaf diverters and screens, though no first flush diverter, to a 15kL PE storage tank.

 

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An Integrated Approach to Water Conservation for Large Users
Water conservation programs targeted at large users will play an integral role securing water supplies for Australian cities in years to come. A hierarchical approach to water conservation– reducing consumption as a priority, then considering internal re-use of water and replacement of potable water with alternative sources – should be the key principle in sustainable water management.
The application of this approach relies on a sound understanding of water consumption at a site: where water is used, why, when and how. This entails smart- and sub-metering of the water supply and detailed analysis of site activities to produce a site water balance.
The hierarchical approach can then be applied, and conservation options can be costed to assess financial viability. ‘Packaging’ measures with different payback times together should be considered, along with funding support available.

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31 USING WSUD TO RESOLVE COMPETING OBJECTIVES-- A CASE STUDY OF A SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

Located within the Hunter River floodplain at Heatherbrae and overlying the Tomago sand bed drinking water aquifer, the development of the Kinross Business Park was frustrated by numerous environmental constraints for many years. This site was constrained by the sensitive underlying shallow aquifer, a sensitive receiving water and by the need to maintain floodplain storage and peak flows. Being a sandy site, the pre-development hydrological regime was one of infiltration. Runoff, it was predicted, would have occurred from this sandy site less frequently than once in ten years. It was not considered possible to develop this site using conventional drainage systems. However, the careful, well-planned application of water sensitive urban design has enabled each of the constraints to be overcome.

 

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A mitigation strategy for the natural disaster of poverty in Bangladesh

This paper reports on a water sensitive urban design initiative by an owner builder at a private residence in Ipswich, Australia. The project applies custom, emergent and established technologies to the management of the owners’ lifestyle preferences and problematic site conditions. It is also an innovative project from the perspective of current governance conditions, making use of previously untried regulatory mechanisms. The project comprises two integrated components: rainwater harvesting and onsite waste treatment, potentially offsetting household reliance on the mains water supply by as much as 90% and offering further beneficial externalities. Rainwater is harvested from a 135m roof catchment through a conveyance system that includes leaf diverters and screens, though no first flush diverter, to a 15kL PE storage tank.

 

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Achieving the Water and Sanitation MDGs in Bangladesh

This paper reports on a water sensitive urban design initiative by an owner builder at a private residence in Ipswich, Australia. The project applies custom, emergent and established technologies to the management of the owners’ lifestyle preferences and problematic site conditions. It is also an innovative project from the perspective of current governance conditions, making use of previously untried regulatory mechanisms. The project comprises two integrated components: rainwater harvesting and onsite waste treatment, potentially offsetting household reliance on the mains water supply by as much as 90% and offering further beneficial externalities. Rainwater is harvested from a 135m roof catchment through a conveyance system that includes leaf diverters and screens, though no first flush diverter, to a 15kL PE storage tank.

 

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ADOPTION OF ARSENIC-SAFE DRINKING WATER PRACTICE IN RURAL BANGLADESH: AN AVERTING BEHAVIOR MODEL

This paper reports on a water sensitive urban design initiative by an owner builder at a private residence in Ipswich, Australia. The project applies custom, emergent and established technologies to the management of the owners’ lifestyle preferences and problematic site conditions. It is also an innovative project from the perspective of current governance conditions, making use of previously untried regulatory mechanisms. The project comprises two integrated components: rainwater harvesting and onsite waste treatment, potentially offsetting household reliance on the mains water supply by as much as 90% and offering further beneficial externalities. Rainwater is harvested from a 135m roof catchment through a conveyance system that includes leaf diverters and screens, though no first flush diverter, to a 15kL PE storage tank.

 

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An Overview of Arsenic Removal Technologies in Bangladesh and India

In the context of prevalence of high concentrations of arsenic in tubewell water,a wide range technologies has been tried for the removal of arsenic fromdrinking water. The most common technologies utilized the conventionalprocesses of oxidation, co-precipitation and adsorption onto coagulated flocs,adsorption onto sorptive media, ion exchange and membrane techniques forarsenic removal.

 

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