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Rainwater harvesting for domestic use

Millions of people throughout the world do not have access to clean water for domestic purposes. In manyparts of the world conventional piped water is either absent, unreliable or too expensive. One of the biggest challenges of the 21stcentury is to overcome the growing water shortage. Rainwater harvesting (RWH) has thus regained its importance as a valuable alternative or supplementary water resource, along with more conventional water supply technologies. Much actual or potential water shortages can be relieved if rainwater harvesting is practised more widely.

 

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Application of Laboratory ExperimentResults into Practice: Clogging of Stormwater Infiltration Systems

Infiltration systems, which are a popular method to managestormwater, have a history of failure due to clogging within a relatively short period. As yet there is not a single method available to predict the clogging, despite the substantial amount of investments is being made in implementing these systems. Therefore, a detailed laboratory study of stormwater infiltration systems was carried out with the aim of gaining a fundamental understanding of the clogging process.

 

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Community Understanding of the Use of Alternative Water Sources for Irrigation of Golf Courses: Ku-ring-gai Council Case Study

As Australian cities have grown, the demand for potable water has gone close to matching, and in more recent times has exceeded, the sustainable supply. Whilst many water authorities procrastinate on constructing new supply schemes, others are increasingly turning to demand management and alternative supply options to achieve a more sustainable balance. New initiatives rely on customer acceptance, understanding and appreciation of the limited supply of potable water and the proposed alternatives. .

 

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Cooperate or coerce? Intergovernmental approaches to mainstreaming Water Sensitive Urban Design

Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) is still largely in its infancy, and many governments, organisations, and communities are still reinforcing the traditional urban water management approach of highly engineered, mutually exclusive water supply, wastewater, and drainage systems. Many agree that institutionalising WSUD to establish widespread practice can only be achieved through a cooperative partnership approach that includes state and local governments. However,there is no consolidated assessment of the necessary ingredients and key factors that produce successful intergovernmental arrangements for WSUD.

 

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Developing Sustainable Water Management Policy For Kogarah

Kogarah Council’s previous Stormwater code was developed in 1998 to impose controls on new developments. The code mainly focused on drainage issues providing solutions primarily On-Site Detention for flood control. Given the Council’s leading role in promoting Total Water Cycle Management in Sydney region, it was time to increase the scope of the Code to incorporate wider water cycle management issues. A Water Management Policy has therefore been developed to replace the current Code, which adapts concepts of Water Sensitive Urban Design, and reflects the outcomes of Kogarah’s floodplain, estuary and water cycle management programs.

 

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Development Of Alternative Water Resources In The USA: Progress With Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater cisterns were used in Texas in the early 1900s, but became obsolete as municipal water distribution systems were being developed. Since the early 1990s however, due to population increase and a higher demand for water supplies, there has been a renewed interest inrainwater harvesting in Texas by private individuals, corporations, water utilities, cities, counties and the state government. The Texas legislature has supported and encouraged the use of rainwater harvesting in the state.

 

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Developing Sustainable Water Management Policy For Kogarah

Kogarah Council’s previous Stormwater code was developed in 1998 to impose controls on new developments. The code mainly focused on drainage issues providing solutions primarily On-Site Detention for flood control. Given the Council’s leading role in promoting Total Water Cycle Management in Sydney region, it was time to increase the scope of the Code to incorporate wider water cycle management issues. A Water Management Policy has therefore been developed to replace the current Code, which adapts concepts of Water Sensitive Urban Design, and reflects the outcomes of Kogarah’s floodplain, estuary and water cycle management programs.

 

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Elements in Tank Water – Comparisons with Mains Water & Effects of Locality & Roofing Materials

The implementation of rainwater harvesting systems on domestic allotments has the potential to mitigate the ongoing water supply crises experienced by many urban centres. External pollution sources, components in the rainwater harvesting system, and biological/chemical reactions in the tank all have the potential to influence rainwater quality. Industry and traffic emissions may contribute to increased concentrations of lead, zinc, cadmium, and arsenic in roof-harvested rainwater (Gould,1999).

 

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Climate Change and Rain Water Harvesting

Climate Change and global warming has become the most concern of the 21stcentaury. The ICCP or Inter government panel on Climate Change reports observations over last 150 years, rise in temperature, rise in global average sea level, reduction of northern hemisphere snow cover, . Associated with increasing temperatures of the atmosphere and the oceans is a proportionate increase in the content of water vapor in the atmosphere (for each degree Celsius of this increase, the air cantheoretically absorb about 7% more water vapor).

 

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Investigating Sediment Dynamics ina Laboratory Rainwater Tank

Rainwater tanks are viewed as an available source of alternative water supply at the house scale that can help overcome the widespread problem of water scarcity in Australian cities. Building standards, government support and incentives encourage the installation and use of rainwater tanks in new and existing houses. Robust design of rainwater tanks is important to limit the problems thatowners and occupants may face when using rainwater tanks, reduce maintenance requirements and help ensure the on-going optimal performance of these rainwater tanks.

 

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