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Micro-credit and Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater Harvesting (RWH) has proven to be a viable alternative water source in challenging environments where other means of water supply have very little or no potential.RWH is often the only solution for water supply particularly in: areas where groundwater levels are very deep or contaminated due the composition of geological aquifers; lands that are arid or semi-arid lands; small coral and volcanic islands, and in remote and scattered human settlements.

 

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Life Cycle Costing of Rainwater Tankas a Component of Water Sensitive Urban Design

Water conservation has become a major issue in Australiain recent times. Additional fresh water supplies are constantly being sought after and rainwater tanks are emerging as a possible solution. Studies have previously focussed on water saving potential of rainwater tanks used in domestic applications but little research has been undertaken on larger multi-storey applications. This paper presents an investigation of the life cycle cost analysis of a 75kL rainwater tank in a hypothetical multistorey residential building in Sydney.

 

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Marching Ahead Towards Water Sustainability Of Delhi – A Public Interest Litigation By Tapas

Delhi, the capital city of India is facing today an acute water crisis reflecting the tragedy of the commons. The problem attributed is not only the shortage of water, but also the lack of proper management of the water resources. In India, the traditional water harvesting structures and the community based management practices and wisdom have been ignored apace since the onset of the British colonial rule. The British introduced a highly centralised bureaucratic top-down management system for water management based on profit making and the scientific vision of conquest of nature.

 

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Modeling and Reliability Assessment for Rainwater Harvesting System

Rainwater harvesting is the technique ofcollection and storage of rainwater from roofs during rain events for future use. This technique is appropriate in many countries such as United Kingdom, Germany, China, Japan, Thailand, Sri Lanka, India, Australia, Brazil and United Statesof America.

 

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Phosphorus Retention Performance in Vegetated and Non-Vegetated Bioretention Mesocosms using Recycled Effluent

Phosphate removal from stormwater and wastewater is essential to prevent eutrophication of waterways. The aim of our study was to evaluate phosphorus retention in vegetated and non-vegetated (barren) bioretention mesocosms. Existing well-established bioretention mesocosms with sandy loam, loamy sand and gravel media were irrigated with 60.9 g-m-2(609 kg-ha-1) TP from recycled effluent between August 2006 and March 2007. Initially, P retention in the barren loam and sand media approached 100%, while gravel retention was only 20%.

 

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Rain Gardens - A Local Government Perspective

Local governments across Australia are approving increasing numbers of ‘rain gardens’ (also known as bioretention systems) within residential streetscapes – eitheras part of new developments or integrated into their own capital works program. The environmental benefits of rain gardens are rarely questioned, however Council officers are now asking themselves about the longer-term practical implications; how much will they cost and how do we manage these assets effectively?

 

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Rainwater Harvesting: A Community’s Technology for Coping with Climate Change

When climate changes, water movements change and human technology adapts. Studies at the International Rainwater Catchment Systems Association (IRCSA) for the last 25 years seem to prepare the mind, the practice and the business for the coming of such event. The paper shall give a short introduction on how climate change may impact on the lives of people and how does the variation challenge water resource management. The experience of climate variability and the prospect of climate change may change key hydrological variables which could turn to be non-linear and therefore bring surprises to unsuspecting communities.

 

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Rainwater Harvesting: Comparison Between Existing Techniques And Its Modification

Gathering rainwater by using roofs, reservoirs and other collectors is called rainwater harvesting.The rainwater harvesting is considered as a possible answer to the global water use problem,especially where surface and groundwater is limited. Also rainwater is soft water, pollution free,iron & Arsenic free. The rooftop rainwater harvesting system seems suitable for Bangladesh, asthe system will be designed only to supply drinking and cooking water.

 

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Rainwater Harvesting In Ethiopia: Capturing Realities and Harnessing Opportunities

In a bid to curb the threat of recurring crop failure, food insecurity, and drought quandaries, the government of Ethiopia has rapidly expanded on-farm based rainwater harvesting (RWH) interventions. Undoubtedly, the scheme has proffered numerous advantages to its beneficiaries, but it was not without setbacks. This study has attempted to appraise the recently launched RWH activities and analyze its performance in the light of key environmental and socioeconomic dimensions. Data were drawn from sample households in the Amhara and Oromia Regional States.

 

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Rainwater Management Facilities and Devices, Case Studies in Germany

The community of Schörzingen (population 1400), a suburb of Schömberg, could well become a Mecca, a destination for a pilgrimage by the rapidly growing number of peoplewho support decentralized rainwater management. Yet chances for a cost-effective,sustainable solution were everything but rosy when the new Lehenbrunnen housing sitewas first developed. Even the name Lehenbrunnen [= "fountain of an estate"] indicatesthis: it is easier to extract water in this landscape than to dispose of it safely. There is nohope for percolating rainwater.

 

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