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Alternative Water Sources: The keys to unlocking the inhibitors of innovation and diffusion in metropolitan Melbourne

This social research project investigated drivers and inhibitors of the diffusion of alternative water sources (AWSs) in metropolitan Melbourne, resulting from the increasing pressure to secure a reliable water supply due to drought and predicted population increase. This was done using a qualitative case study approach, drawing on multiple sources of evidence. including a historical review, policy and regulatory review, case study reviews at the development/implementation level, and semi-structured interviews with stakeholders at the implementation level.

 

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Bagging Industrial Drains: A Solid Media Survey Of Stormwater Contamination

Conventional approaches to stormwater quality evaluation combine continuous flow rate monitoring and automated sample collection for chemical analysis to derive an event mean concentration for each pollutant of concern. This approach requires expensive flow monitoring and automated sample collection equipment and the costly analysis of high numbers of water samples. Consequently, such monitoring is prohibitively expensive and is rarely conducted.

 

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Developing WSUD Policies In The City Of Sydney-Thompson

The City of Sydney Council is currently creating a new Local Environment Plan (LEP) and a new Development Control Plan (DCP). These plans are the principle means by which development is implemented within the City of Sydney, which includes both the unique area of the Central Business District (CBD) and surrounding residential and industrial areas. The new plans seek to integrate City of Sydney’s existing policies, and update these policies to reflect environmental best practice.

 

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Ian White

This paper reports on a water sensitive urban design initiative by an owner builder at a private residence in Ipswich, Australia. The project applies custom, emergent and established technologies to the management of the owners’ lifestyle preferences and problematic site conditions. It is also an innovative project from the perspective of current governance conditions, making use of previously untried regulatory mechanisms. The project comprises two integrated components: rainwater harvesting and onsite waste treatment, potentially offsetting household reliance on the mains water supply by as much as 90% and offering further beneficial externalities. Rainwater is harvested from a 135m roof catchment through a conveyance system that includes leaf diverters and screens, though no first flush diverter, to a 15kL PE storage tank. A high performance pump feeds the rainwater successively through a filter and water meter to a Bianco Rainsaver which enables switching between the rainwater supply and mains water back-up. Water is supplied throughout the house via a PE-X water service to every outlet except the kitchen sink. The kitchen sink (plumbed separately) permanently draws from the mains water supply, a necessity with Ipswich City Council regulations. Flow restrictors and AAA (or higher) rated fixtures and fittings are used throughout the home and a 30-tube 315L Endless Solar hot water service is used. All waste water (black and grey water) is processed onsite in an OzziKleen RP10A advanced secondary treatment plant that features custom modifications for this project (due to site conditions, but not affecting system performance). Permission to install the OzziKleen RP10A system was obtained under s4 of the Queensland Plumbing and Wastewater Code 2006, with this project as a test case. The paper presents the author/owner’s experience researching, installing and using the various technological components. It addresses problems and resolution of relevant compliance and regulation issues, with conclusions drawn from these experiences. It concludes with plans to operate the site as a non-commercial community education project.

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