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Sustainable Water Management: Achieving A Culture of Change

In the driest continent on earth, population growth, extended drought conditions and the potential impact of climate change has hammered home the need for an integrated approach to water management. Water authorities, councils, water industry organisations and developers face many challenges in delivering sustainable solutions to urban water management issues associated with stormwater management, water recycling and reuse. One of the most significant challenges is managing the cultural and organisational changes necessary to adopt new ways of thinking and to become leaders in implementing new approaches to sustainable urban water management. The 2005 inaugural winner of the Brian Robinson Fellowship Jacquie White developed the Principles To Practice project, designed to explore socio-organisational issues associated with implementing sustainable water management, and investigate factors that influence effective knowledge building and information sharing.

 

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WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN THE REMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER ARSENIC CONTAMINATION IN BANGLADESH
Severe arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh has disrupted the idea of using shallow tube-wells for safe drinking water throughout the country. Millions of tube-wells that had been sunk in various parts of the country are now dispensing arsenic contaminated drinking water. As a result, thousands of people are suffering from arsenic related diseases. The severity of arsenic contamination necessitates restricted use of groundwater and a move to alternative water sources such as ponds, lakes, canals, rivers and rain. Assured, affordable and sustainable safe water sources are vital for all communities to combat an arsenic disaster.

 

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Water as a Detonator of a Model of Communitarian Sustainable Development: The Case of Villa García Márquez at La Barca, Jalisco, Mexico
The present work describes in general way a model of sustainable development applied to small communities, from considering to the water as a development axis. This proposal would be located in the community of Villa Garcia Marquez, Municipality of La Barca, Jalisco Mexico, which comprises the river basin of the Lake of Chapala, which is the most important natural water reservoir of the country and it displays remarkable environmental problems and of over-exploitation at the present time. The community Villa de Garcia Marquez, have an important backwardness in its development mainly because of the lack of fresh water, deforestation, low farming productivity, low quality of urban services and urban image, high migration from men to the United States, that’s why women integrated the population mainly, lack of job opportunities and human development.

 

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Urban Water Systems: Drivers of Climate Change?

Urban water systems contribute to climate change both directly through the fugitive greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with water storage reservoirs and wastewater treatment processes, and indirectly through significant energy and materials consumption. This paper presents the findings of an investigation of the GHG emissions associated with operating a case study urban water system in Melbourne, Australia. It was revealed that the appliances associated with the residential end uses of water were responsible for significantly more GHG emissions than all upstream and downstream operations.

 

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Towards An Institutional Capacity Assessment Framework For Sustainable Urban Water Management

The need to change urban water management to become more sustainable is widely recognised. Recently there has been considerable financial investment in urban water reform; however these reforms have not been as successful as anticipated, most likely because there is a lack of critical analysis of existing capacity and/or capacity deficits. Understanding and assessing institutional capacity is crucial to addressing existing institutional impediments. Institutional capacity includes the human resources, intra-organisational, inter-organisational and/or external rules and incentives capacity spheres.

 

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The Socio-Technical Challenges of Safe Water Supply in Rural Bangladesh

In the arsenic- and salinity-affected areas of Bangladesh, rural people still struggle  to procure safe drinking water due to technological, institutional and policy barriers. This paper identifies and analyzes these barriers by using a policy orientation approach. Social and decision processes are mapped to demonstrate the historic and present-day trends and conditions for water supply. Options for different potable water technologies are assessed and alternative future development scenarios using models of different water supply programs are projected for the provision of safe water for the rural communities in Bangladesh.

 

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The Impact Of End-Use Dynamics On Urban Water System Design Criteria

Demand reduction strategies such as source substitution (rainwater tanks/water reuse) and the use of water efficient appliances has the potential to significantly impact on urban water system design criteria, such as average and peak demands/wastewater flows. To quantify this impact requires knowledge of the dynamics of household end-uses (shower, toilet, washing machine, tap and outdoor use). This study utilised high-quality end-use monitoring from a Newcastle house over a 2 month period to investigate how end-use dynamics and demand reduction strategies impact on common design criteria.

 

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THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS INTERMITTENT DRY-WET CYCLES ON NITROGEN REMOVAL CAPACITY IN BIOFILTERS SYSTEMS

Stormwater biofilter systems have the potential to remove nutrients from urban runoff. These systems operate in unique intermittent dry-wet cycles that may affect their performance. Current consensus suggests that sediment drying promotes the release of potentially significant amounts of bio-available nitrogen and phosphorus upon re-wetting. We sought to investigate the impact of drying/wetting cycles on biofilter performance. Eighteen columns were planted with Carex appressa which reached maturity after eight months. The recovery of biofilter systems was tested in a range of drying periods from one to eight weeks with and without a Submerged Anoxic Zone (SAZ) and carbon supplement in the filter media. In all experiments, moisture content, adjacent soil and ambient temperature were logged in parallel to record the drawdown profile behaviour.

 

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Testing and Refining a Policy and Methods Framework for Water Sensitive Urban Design

An important means of facilitating the uptake of Water Sensitive Urban Design, which has much in common with ‘low impact’ approaches, is to ensure that local government plans and practices are underpinned by an appropriate set of principles. A research programme in New Zealand, that is facilitating the uptake and implementation of low impact urban design policies and practices, has developed principles as a foundation for policy development in local government statutory and non-statutory plans and guidelines. Each principle is related to practical implementation methods many of which use sustainable technologies that need to be tested for their feasibility, practicality and effectiveness.

 

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MARCHING AHEAD TOWARDS WATER SUSTAINABILITY OF DELHI – A PUBLIC INTEREST LITIGATION BY TAPAS

Delhi, the capital city of India is facing today an acute water crisis reflecting the tragedy of the commons. The problem attributed is not only the shortage of water, but also the lack of proper management of the water resources. In India, the traditional water harvesting structures and the community based management practices and wisdom have been ignored apace since the onset of the British colonial rule. The British introduced a highly centralised bureaucratic top-down management system for water management based on profit making and the scientific vision of conquest of nature.

 

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